If your crying and/or laughing doesn’t match how you feel,

it could be a sign of PBA.

All participants are real patients/caregivers and have been compensated.

Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA) is a medical condition causing sudden, frequent, uncontrollable crying and/or laughing that doesn’t match how you feel. It can happen in people with a brain injury or certain neurologic conditions.

Images of people affected by Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA) Images of people affected by Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA)

All participants are real patients/caregivers and have been compensated.

It’s more common than you think.

Do you have PBA symptoms?
Scroll to learn more.

What is PBA?

Amy, patient with Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA) and her friend and caregiver Laura, talking over coffee

Laura and Amy are a real caregiver and patient and have been compensated.

PBA is different from depression.

Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA) is sometimes mistaken for or attributed to , but the two are separate conditions with their own symptoms.

Learn what defines PBA

Laura and Amy are a real caregiver and patient and have been compensated.

Could you have PBA?

Take a short, 7 question quiz to find out if your crying and/or laughing episodes may suggest PBA. Eligible quiz takers will have the opportunity to speak to a registered nurse through the PBA Nurse Talk* program to learn more about PBA.

Take the PBA Quiz
*PBA Nurse Talk is sponsored by Avanir Pharmaceuticals, Inc., which is committed to supporting those who may be suffering from PBA. This program is offered at no cost to you, does not require health insurance, and does not replace speaking with your healthcare provider – only your healthcare provider can diagnose you with PBA. Your conversation with a nurse will remain completely confidential. PBA Nurse Talk is only available to eligible people experiencing uncontrollable crying and/or laughing, not their caregivers.

[My episodes are] embarrassing, and no one understands what is happening. I don't even understand. It is nice to finally learn more about this condition.


- Real PBA Nurse Talk caller

PBA Nurse Talk patient avatar
Images of people affected by Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA)

Ask your healthcare provider how to manage PBA

Get tips for talking to your healthcare provider about your symptoms so you can start the conversation about PBA.

Neurologists, psychiatrists, internists, neuropsychiatrists, and physiatrists are types of healthcare providers who may be able to help identify PBA symptoms and diagnose properly.

Supporting someone with PBA

If you know or care for someone with PBA, you may be wondering how you can help.

All participants are real patients/caregivers and have been compensated.

Images of people affected by Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA)

All participants are real patients/caregivers and have been compensated.

Become a PBA Ambassador, like Sequena

Sequena, a patient with Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA), and her daughter Liyah

Sequena is a stroke survivor who was diagnosed with PBA. She joined the PBA Ambassador program in 2021 so she could help others learn from her experience. “I love telling my story to let others know about my journey to diagnosis.”

Share your story

Sequena is a real patient and has been compensated.

MLR-PBA-US-0795-1022